Blog Archives

Will NoSQL Equal No DBA in Enterprise IT?

During the recent CouchConf in San Francisco, Frank Weigel, a Couchbase product manager, touted the benefits of schemaless databases: without a schema, developers may add fields without going through a DBA. The audience of developers seemed pleased, but I wondered

Posted in NoSQL

Thoughts on CouchConf: Data Modeling for Flow

Last Friday, I had the pleasure of attending CouchConf in San Francisco to learn about the new and exciting features of Couchbase 2.0. With the new release, Couchbase becomes a full document oriented database . Meanwhile, Couchbase keeps its focus on performance,

Posted in Couchbase, NoSQL

Not NoSQL, NewSQL

This Monday at the Silicon Valley NewSQL meetup in Mountain View, Michael Stonebreaker took turns bashing both the established relational databases (Oracle, DB2, SQL Server, PostgreSQL)  and the NoSQL newcomers (MongoDB, Cassandra, Riak), proposing a third alternative, VoltDB, a NewSQL

Posted in NewSQL, NoSQL

Exploring NoSQL: Couchbase

In February 2011, Membase, Inc. and CouchOne merged to combine the strengths of their two open-source NoSQL projects, Membase and CouchDB. The joint team released Couchbase 1.8 in January, 2012 as an upgrade to Membase 1.7. Version 2.0 is now

Posted in Couchbase, CouchDB, MongoDB, NoSQL, Uncategorized

Be Careful with Sloppy Quorums

In my last posts on eventual consistency, I mentioned that R+W>N guarantees consistency. Thanks to commentator senderista for pointing that this statement does not hold in the case of sloppy quorums. The Amazon Dynamo article describes sloppy quorum as such:

Posted in NoSQL, Riak

Exploring NoSQL: Fine Tuning CAP with Riak

In previous posts, I explored MongoDB and Redis. MongoDB, a document-oriented database, allows developers to work with JSON documents in interesting ways. Redis offers developers a set of fundamental data structures upon which to build applications. Riak, in contrast, offers

Posted in NoSQL, Riak

MongoDB Aggregation Framework: The SQL of NoSQL

No, it’s not really SQL. Its syntax resembles JSON. It returns a collection of JSON documents. But the Aggregation Framework addresses for MongoDB what many have found lacking in non-relational databases, the capability for ad hoc queries that SQL performs

Posted in MongoDB, NoSQL